Racial equity can be defined as "the condition that would be achieved if one's race identity no longer influenced how one fares." (from "Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture" by Equity in the Center). This collection focuses on racial equity and also includes works that explore the larger diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework. Our aim is to raise awareness about funding for racial equity efforts as well as activities in the social sector meant to realize racial equity. The collection is part of Candid's Funding for racial equity special issue website.

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A Year of Learning: Educating the Philanthropic Community About Racialized and Stigmatized Nonprofits

October 1, 2022

The Muslim nonprofit sector is diverse and young, with many organizations established in the post-9/11 era. The Muslim nonprofit sector has been under scrutiny and faces discrimination in the form of Islamophobia. The racialized and stigmatized identity of Muslims has further increased the disconnect between the Muslim nonprofit sector and the philanthropic community. This report paper examines the work of the Year of Learning and its attempts to educate philanthropic leaders about the importance of engaging with racialized minorities including US Muslims. It raised the following questions: Why is there a lack of interaction between the racialized nonprofit sector and the foundation world? What are the challenges? This research suggests that the most powerful way to overcome these challenges is by engaging and educating both sides.

#JusticeIsTheFoundation: Assessing Philanthropy’s Commitment to Racial Equity & Justice in Education

September 6, 2022

2020 was a year marked by movements and popular resistance unprecedented in scope in the wake of the police murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. These waves of protest were matched by waves of press releases, from foundations and businesses large and small, pledging not only verbal support for addressing racism but significant monetary pledges to make it a reality. Estimates of the total amount pledged ranged from the tens of billions of dollars on the low end to McKinsey's mid-2021 estimate of $200 billion.In December 2021, the Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity (PRE) released a report examining whether the new funding commitments to racial equity and justice made by foundations and large corporations were fulfilled. PRE's finding, that the amount of confirmed money distributed was a mere shadow of the public pledges made, was corroborated by a report by PolicyLink and The Bridgespan Group in June 2021 after more grant data had been collected.The story the data tells of 2020 is that when it comes to race, too often in philanthropy we talk the talk but we're less likely to finish the race.One of the most critical needs during the dual COVID and racial injustice pandemic was supporting children and families and protecting young people's opportunity to learn and to thrive. As such, it was critically important that education and funders deliver at an accelerated rate.The Schott Foundation for Public Education worked with Candid, a center for nonprofit resources and tools, over the past two years to critically examine the ultimate measure of K-12 education philanthropy's priorities: where the grant dollars go. Our project, #JusticeIsTheFoundation, assesses the collective philanthropic impact of giving in the education sector through a lens of racial equity and racial justice. The data tells the story of what philanthropy prioritizes and reveals blind spots in our collective response. In early 2021, we launched the project with the first data set from that collaboration, based on grants made from 2017-2019. In this report, we're covering grants made from 2018-2020.As you will see in the pages ahead, K-12 education philanthropy has a long way to go to meet the demands of this urgent moment.

Insights from Hewlett Foundation’s Performing Arts OE-EID Grants

August 31, 2022

In 2019, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Performing Arts Program, in collaboration with a community advisory council, awarded a round of 39 grants to support Bay Area performing arts organizations in building their capacity around equity, inclusion, and diversity (referred to as the Organizational Effectiveness - Equity, Inclusion and Diversity or OE-EID grants) through a participatory grantmaking process.To reflect on this round of grants, the Performing Arts Program engaged Community Wealth Partners to conduct an assessment. The assessment process engaged a group of 10 leaders whose organizations had received an OE-EID grant as a grantee learning team to make meaning of data from grant reports and develop recommendations for the foundation based on the data and their own experiences. The Performing Arts Program and Community Wealth Partners chose this approach because it would focus on the perspectives of grantees, yield more detailed information about grantees' experiences than what was included in the grant reports, and create an opportunity for two-way conversation between the Performing Arts Program and grantees about promising practices and implications for the future.This document shares quantitative findings from a review of 26 final grant reports1 (from the 39 grants made) as well as insights and recommendations that came out of the work of the grantee learning team.

Black Voices, Black Spaces: The Power of Black Innovation

August 15, 2022

This report explores the philanthropic dynamics affecting Black social innovators and concludes with lessons for the social entrepreneurship field to meaningfully fund and support Black innovation and impact. The learnings are informed by more than 15 interviews and case studies with social innovation field leaders and Black leaders supported through Echoing Green's Black Male Achievement (BMA) Fellowship – the world's first fellowship for social entrepreneurs creating systemic change for Black men and boys in the U.S.

Black Nonprofit Fundraising Guide

August 12, 2022

As part of our work to address disparities in fundraising for Black nonprofit organizations, we've partnered with Young, Black, & Giving Back Institute and ABFE to put together an educational guide that includes tactics and strategies for Black-led and Black-serving nonprofits to amplify their messaging and activate supporters all year long.This guide was developed using ABFE's Racial Equity framework as a guiding principle for addressing disparities in fundraising for Black nonprofits. ABFE's Racial Equity framework promotes effective and responsive philanthropy in Black communities by analyzing strategies that allow grantmakers and donors to effectively support Black-led and Black-serving nonprofits and their communities.

Building Trust Through Practice: A Shared Journey Toward an Inclusive Economy

April 13, 2022

In this new report, Building Trust Through Practice: A Shared Journey Toward an Inclusive Economy, the Surdna Foundation's Inclusive Economies team shares how they implemented a new strategy with and for their grantee partners. And the practice, insights, and lessons learned along the way.   

Measuring Together: A Learning Approach for Inclusive Economies

January 25, 2022

In 2020, the Surdna Foundation's Inclusive Economies and Learning Grants Operations teams, alongside a dedicated group of grantee partners, completed phase one of a two-part pilot program to co-create a set of metrics and indicators to measure progress toward collective goals. Phase one focused on the metrics identification and collection process. Phase two of the report, Measuring Together: A Learning Approach for Inclusive Economies, examines one year of metrics data reported by grantees to:  Explore grantees' progress toward their self-selected targetsGain understanding about the types of successes and challenges grantees are experiencingIncorporate grantees' feedback on the metrics collection and analysis process as we move beyond the pilot phase and implement this part of our learning systems fully. 

Looking in the equity & inclusion mirror: Lessons from an OSF Program

December 1, 2021

This learning brief provides an overview of EJP's internal review of its own practices and culture in relation to intersectional equity and the lessons learned along the way. The aim is to share insights and resources for funders and grantee partners who are considering undertaking a similar equity-focused review and to encourage action on intersectional equity within the field.The Economic Justice Program (EJP) of the Open Society Foundations ran from 2018 until the end of December 2021. During this time, and building on the work of its two parent programs (Fiscal Governance and Economic Advancement), EJP developed the Foundations' first-ever strategy dedicated to fighting economic injustice and pioneered approaches to good grantmaking and investing for social change.

Foundations Respond to Crisis: Lasting Change?

November 29, 2021

Philanthropic and nonprofit leaders have called for changes in foundation practice for decades, asking funders to, for example, provide more flexible and unrestricted funding; streamline and simplify processes; listen to, trust, and support their grantees; and pursue racial equity and racial justice.But there had been little evidence of change until the spring of 2020, when many foundations shifted their practices as the scale of the COVID-19 crisis became clear. In a series of three reports released late last year by CEP, we found that foundations made many changes to their practices, such as providing more unrestricted support and streamlining processes. In addition, many foundations reported providing new support to lower-income, Black, or Latino communities, and to organizations created and led by people from the communities most affected by systemic inequities.Since then, CEP has collected new survey and interview data from foundation and nonprofit leaders to examine whether these changes continued into 2021 and whether they will continue in the future.

Reimagining Capacity Building: Navigating Culture, Systems & Power

October 20, 2021

With racial equity becoming more and more central to the work of grantmakers, in this guide GEO explores how considerations related to racial equity can apply to the full range of grantmakers' capacity-building efforts — everything from financial management to human resources to leadership development. Advancing racial equity in philanthropy, of course, calls for a systemic response that extends beyond capacity-building practices. At the same time, given the prevalence and importance of capacity-building initiatives within the GEO community, it behooves us to take a specific and critical look at how we can make the practice of capacity building more racially equitable — and ideally apply these principles more broadly to our work within the sector. Of note, this guide does not focus on equally important and related efforts on racial equity capacity building — in other words, the training and activities organizations participate in to deepen their understanding of racial equity itself.

Mismatched: Philanthropy’s Response to the Call for Racial Justice

October 16, 2021

Mismatched: Philanthropy's Response to the Call for Racial Justice is the most comprehensive assessment of racial equity and racial justice funding to date, providing a detailed analysis of funding from 2015–2018 and a preliminary analysis for 2020. Written by Malkia Devich Cyril, Lyle Matthew Kan, Ben Francisco Maulbeck, and Lori Villarosa, the report examines trends, contradictions, and divergences in funding for both racial equity and racial justice work.

Beyond Inclusion: The Critical Role of People of Color in the U.S. Documentary Ecosystem

October 15, 2021

Drawing from a dataset of nearly 200 organizations, Beyond Inclusion details the key functions and activities of these organizations today, which range from supporting the artists (providing equipment and training, resources, and networking opportunities), to distributing the works of filmmakers of color to audiences of color, to funding.The report's recommendations to funders include investing in POC-led organizations with clear plans and commitments to nurture POC authorship, audiences, and careers as well as film production models and practices with a higher standard of ethics and accountability in the creation, funding and distribution of documentaries.The report concludes that a generational investment in POC infrastructure is necessary to both shore up legacy organizations that have worked with minimal resources for decades as well as dynamic new organizations and networks that have emerged in the last ten years. These players constitute a powerful ecosystem that -- if properly resourced -- can be a significant force in transforming the documentary landscape toward one that is more inclusive, ethically grounded and sustainable, and that ultimately is a more powerful force for social change.