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Racial equity can be defined as "the condition that would be achieved if one's race identity no longer influenced how one fares." (from "Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture" by Equity in the Center). This collection focuses on racial equity and also includes works that explore the larger diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework. Our aim is to raise awareness about funding for racial equity efforts as well as activities in the social sector meant to realize racial equity. The collection is part of Candid's Funding for racial equity special issue website.

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"Endless Walk!" by Rayhane saber licensed through Unsplash

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Dismantling the Pre-School to Prison Pipeline Through Black Literacy and Education for Transformation: Recommendations for school leaders, parents and policymakers

March 18, 2023

Literacy has been weaponized against Black families and children since the first Europeans began kidnapping Africans for the purposes of enriching themselves through chattel slavery. This study is an examination of how that weaponization of literacy has evolved, manifesting in our contemporary world as a system of interlocking oppressions that we shorthand here as the "Pre-School to Prison Pipeline."While the challenges we identify, document, and analyze in this paper are ancient, we propose realistic solutions, all of which revolve around the need for increased effectiveness and investment in literacy and educational opportunity for Black children.The African continent and the many peoples who live in its diaspora have always enjoyed rich literary traditions. While those traditions were upended by enslavement, obfuscated by the plantation, constrained by Jim Crow, and further marginalized by an ever-expanding system of mass incarceration, there has never been a moment in that history when the candle of our great literacy traditions was extinguished.This paper examines the various tools that oppressors have used to suppress Black literacy; the ways in which Black families have resisted that suppression; and the policies, practices, changes, and investments that we need now to ensure that our children, and their children, can thrive, no matter what the future holds

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in K-16 Education in Rhode Island

January 26, 2023

Racial and ethnic disparities have existed in the United States and Rhode Island from its founding. Removal of Native Americans, several centuries of slavery, a century of Jim Crow laws, and residential segregation created large gaps in academic access and attainment for Students of Color. While policies that created segregated schools ended decades ago, America and Rhode Island have yet to see a truly integrated educational system that produces high-quality educational opportunities for all.In the U.S., Black and Latino students have become increasingly segregated from white students over the last 30 years. Black and Latino students generally attend schools in which students are disproportionately Students of Color and high-poverty, while white students attend schools in which students are disproportionately white and low-poverty.Students in schools with high concentrations of low-income students and Students of Color have unequal educational opportunities when compared with the educational opportunities available to students who attend schools that are more diverse or that have mostly higher-income or predominantly white students because the schools they attend have more absences, lower graduation rates, teachers who have less classroom experience, and more teachers who are teaching outside their subject area of expertise.

Prioritizing Racial Equity Within Social and Emotional Learning in Tacoma: One of Six Case Studies of Schools and Out-of-School-Time Program Partners

September 15, 2022

This case study is one of a series detailing how schools and out-of-school-time (OST) programs in six communities have collaborated to build students' social and emotional skills. The communities are participants in Wallace's Partnerships for Social and Emotional Learning Initiative, which has brought together school districts and their OST partners to develop and implement mutually reinforcing social and emotional learning (SEL) activities and instruction across learning settings.The piece features Lister Elementary School in Tacoma and its efforts to build a schoolwide commitment to SEL. It describes how, over time, Lister school leaders and staff members integrated a focus on racial equity and restorative practices into its SEL approach. The school used four key strategies as its work evolved, including gaining and maintaining staff buy-in to the effort, building racial equity and restorative practices into its SEL resources, designing and delivering a range of professional supports to build staff members' SEL and equity capacity, and reframing SEL and equity work as complementary to (rather than competing with) academic priorities.

High Joblessness for Black Youth: More Than 500,000 Jobs are Needed

August 3, 2022

Black youth should have a higher rate of employment than white youth since they have a greater need to work. In general, Black youth have less wealth and a higher poverty rate than white youth. Black youth are less likely to pursue a bachelor's or advanced degree, and, if they do, they are more likely to drop out of college than white youth. Black youth are more likely to start a family before 25 than white youth. Unfortunately, because of antiblack discrimination in the labor market and other factors, Black youth work less than white youth. There is a very high rate of joblessness among Black youth relative to their white peers — higher than even that suggested by the unemployment rate. This high rate of joblessness sets many Black youths on a troubled path into adulthood, a path that will also cause difficulties for their children.

Advancing Racial Equity in Maternal-Child Health and Addressing Disparities through a Reproductive and Birth Justice Lens - Full Report

June 24, 2022

Fom 2014 to 2015, W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) partnered with the University of New Mexico evaluation team to conduct a study to examine if and how the Foundation's investments in the strategies of folic acid initiative, home visiting, doulas, breastfeeding peer counselors and baby-friendly hospitals were improving maternal-child health in WKKF's priority places in New Mexico. One key finding in the Healthy Birth & Early Development in New Mexico evaluation report was that these strategies supported a continuum-of-care that is essential for strengthening the health and wellbeing of babies, mothers, and families from preconception through a child's third year. A continuum of care framework was developed by the evaluators to capture achievable short-term outcomes such as healthy family behaviors, policy change and systems change that over time could be linked to improvement in the long-term outcomes of full-term births, healthy birth weights, exclusive access to mother's milk, decreased adverse childhood experiences, increased social support, improved parental well-being, and healthy developmental milestones. 

Advancing Racial Equity in Maternal-Child Health and Addressing Disparities through a Reproductive and Birth Justice Lens - Report Summary

June 24, 2022

This report expands upon earlier healthy birth and early development work by critically examining how local community-based organizations are addressing maternal-child health-racial inequities and disparities. While home visiting, breastfeeding, doulas and baby-friendly hospitals are essential strategies for improving maternal-child health, a health gap still exists for women and families of color, as evidenced by high infant and maternal mortality rates and low infant birth weight rates in New Mexico, particularly for women of color. While the maternal-child health strategies may improve access to care for women and families of color, they do not necessarily translate to quality of care. "Evidence-based" practices will not lead to changed outcomes for W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) target populations if racial equity is not addressed and foundational in the work. The report explored how WKKF grantees are addressing, advocating for, and implementing actions to advance equity to improve maternal-child health outcomes

Researchers Should Understand and Adapt Race and Ethnicity Data That Change Over Time

March 31, 2022

Embedding race equity principles into supports provided for young people who age out of foster care can better prepare them for a successful transition into adulthood. Child welfare practitioners and policymakers must consider how race and racism affect a young person's child welfare experience and the services and supports they receive. For example, practitioners and policymakers should understand how employment program outcomes vary by race/ethnicity, or the ways in which access to culturally competent sexual and reproductive health care varies by race/ethnicity. This focus on race equity principles ensures that all young people have access to services tailored to their needs.For practitioners and policymakers to accurately interpret data and make decisions about programming for all racial and ethnic groups, researchers must be able to capture someone's racial and ethnic identity alongside their outcomes. One common resource available to researchers who want to examine outcomes over time is panel, or longitudinal, data, for which the same people are repeatedly and regularly surveyed over an extended period of time. However, researchers should carefully consider how they use these data in analysis because individuals' responses to race/ethnicity and other demographic variables may change over time. When researchers treat race/ethnicity as an unchanging variable they potentially miss important equity considerations.Reviews of panel data show that responses to questions on racial and ethnic identity can and do change over time. While this is a fairly common occurrence in longitudinal data for respondents of all ages (adolescence through adulthood), such changes may be particularly meaningful for young people aging out of foster care. These young people's child welfare experiences (e.g., frequent moves, lack of information about family history, placement in foster homes with parents of a different racial and ethnic identity) may leave them without the information needed to form a healthy racial and ethnic identity. During the transition to adulthood, implicit and explicit biases around racial and ethnic identity from both individuals and systems can create opportunities and barriers at key moments in life, such as pursing postsecondary education or attaining first jobs. Despite the potential fluidity of racial and ethnic identity, however, this variable is commonly treated as static and unchanging in analysis. To date, there are few resources to guide researchers in designing and conducting analyses that both honor the racial and ethnic identities of young people and maximize the reliability of the data.In this brief, we first provide some background on racial and ethnic identity formation and describe some of the barriers to this identity formation process that child welfare system involvement may create for young people. Next, we qualitatively explore, through interviews with former foster youth, why racial and ethnic identity may shift during emerging adulthood, particularly among young people with foster care experience. The interviews provide context on the importance of honoring a young person's chosen identity as that identity shifts. We then explore the practical implications of these identity changes for researchers by quantitatively demonstrating how small decisions made while preparing longitudinal data for analysis can produce completely different results.After describing patterns of racial and ethnic changes observed in our dataset, we then undertake what we call a "three-approach analysis" in which we repeat the same analysis three different ways, with the only change being how we prepare the racial and ethnic data. We conclude by discussing the equity implications of being transparent and detailed when describing how racial and ethnic identity data is used in research studies.

Reform Brief: Law Enforcement Leadership for Equity Initiative

October 1, 2021

As another push for reforms to law enforcement sweeps the nation, this brief provides lessons for the process oflaw enforcement-led change developed during a recent effort by four departments to reduce racial and ethnicdisparities in their interactions with youth. The Center for Children's Law and Policy ("CCLP"), a national policypartner that pursues reforms to protect the rights of children in the youth justice and other systems, supportedthese departments to own and lead change to test a new hypothesis of how to achieve measurable change in disparitiesthrough the Law Enforcement Leadership for Equity (LELE) Initiative. 

Black Child National Agenda: America Must Deliver on its Promise

September 30, 2021

Black children's lives matter. Unfortunately, Black children in the United States of America face a dual reality: growing up in the "land of opportunity" while also experiencing the reality of racism and inequities that impact their daily lives. The Equity Research ActionCoalition, POINTS of ACCESS, LLC, and the National Black Child Development Institute have collaborated in creating the Black Child National Agenda because of the urgent need to challenge the negative and stereotypical narrative of Black children, families, and communities and to challenge policies and systems that undermine basic human rights and community wellness.

Family Surveillance by Algorithm: The Rapidly Spreading Tools Few Have Heard Of

September 29, 2021

The latest reckoning with structural racism in the United States has involved critical reflection on the role of the criminal justice system, education policy, and housing practices in perpetuating racial inequity. But another area long overdue for collective reexamination is the child welfare system and the algorithms working behind the scenes. That's why the ACLU has conducted a nationwide survey to learn more about these tools.This report examines how many jurisdictions across the 50 states, D.C. and U.S. territories are using one category of predictive analytics tools: models that systematically use data collected by jurisdictions' public agencies to attempt to predict the likelihood that a child in a given situation or location will be maltreated.

Anti-Asian Bullying and Harassment: Symptoms of racism in K-12 schools during COVID-19

August 24, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed many challenges for K-12 students. However, these challenges have not been experienced equally across student groups. There has been a significant increase in mainstream media coverage of anti-Asian racism, but very little attention has been given to Asian American youth, who are not immune from incidents of bullying and harassment in our K-12 schools. This brief discusses how Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI)1 students face unique challenges associated with bullying and harassment because of their racial and ethnic identity. We examine the historical context of bullying and harassment of Asian Americans and how that persists as anti-Asian racism today. Finally, we propose policy solutions to create a more positive learning environment and address racist attitudes towards this specific community. Notably, we propose that K-12 leaders disaggregate data by ethnic subgroup, collect more comprehensive data on school bullying, harassment, and victimization disaggregated by AAPI ethnic subgroups, and invest in culturally sustaining mental health resources and curriculum.

Equity Reset Toolkit: Re-envision Instruction Through Equitable Systems

June 25, 2021

One of the biggest disruptions of the pandemic is to our public education system and the more than 50 million students in it. Our most vulnerable student populations are especially impacted by school closures, where they are often left without access to equitable instruction. Districts can take this moment to respond to the needs resulting from learning disruptions and re-envision how their systems support educational equity. The Equity Reset Toolkit provides resources for district teams to complete a nine-week data collection and analysis process focused on equitable learning recovery in K-12 ELA and math as well as tools to create a data-driven equitable education recovery plan for restructuring or building systems that can be adapted for in-person, remote, or blended learning.