Racial equity can be defined as "the condition that would be achieved if one's race identity no longer influenced how one fares." (from "Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture" by Equity in the Center). This collection focuses on racial equity and also includes works that explore the larger diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework. Our aim is to raise awareness about funding for racial equity efforts as well as activities in the social sector meant to realize racial equity. The collection is part of Candid's Funding for racial equity special issue website.

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Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color

January 1, 2021

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color is a new research agenda that outlines six strategies for advancing equity and opportunity for Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) in the U.S. These strategies and recommendations lift up ways to ensure their voices and perspectives are reflected in research and funding; to promote power and capacity-building in their communities; and to build more equitable, anti-racist research and evaluation systems.

Advancing Racial Equity in Philanthropy: A Scan of Philanthropy-Serving Organizations

July 31, 2018

United Philanthropy Forum conducted a scan of regional and national philanthropy-serving organizations (PSOs) in February through May 2018 to get a more comprehensive understanding of PSOs' current work and future needs to advance racial equity in philanthropy. The scan involved both a survey that asked about PSOs' current work, future needs and greatest challenges in advancing racial equity, plus in-depth interviews to discuss what it takes to do this work effectively and to identify their key challenges, barriers and opportunities for addressing systemic inequities.The scan reflects the input of 43 regional and national PSOs that participated in the scan survey and/or the scan interviews, representing more than half of the Forum's membership. The scan report includes the Forum's plan for action to respond to the scan's key findings.The Forum's racial equity scan was made possible in part thanks to support from the Ford Foundation and W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Business Case for Racial Equity

July 24, 2018

The United States economy could be $8 trillion larger by 2050 if the country eliminated racial disparities in health, education, incarceration and employment, according to "The Business Case for Racial Equity: A Strategy for Growth." The gains would be equivalent to a continuous boost in GDP growth of 0.5 percent per year, increasing the competitiveness of the country for decades to come. The national study released today by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) and Altarum concludes that while racial inequities needlessly stifle economic growth, there is a path forward.The report projects a tremendous boost to the country's workforce and consumer spending when organizations take the necessary steps to advance racial equity. Led by Ani Turner, co-director of Sustainable Health Spending Strategies at Altarum, researchers analyzed data from public and private sources, including the U.S. Census, Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, Brandeis University and Harvard University. Their methodology included applying established models to estimate the economic impact of the disparities faced by people of color.

Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture

May 1, 2018

In a sector focused on improving social outcomes across a wide range of issues, we need only look within our own organizations to understand why we have not yet achieved the depth of change we seek. Throughout the social sector, there remains a glaring omission of a fundamental element of social impact: race equity. Race equity must be centered as a core goal of social impact across the sector in order to achieve our true potential and fulfill our organizational missions. The goal of this publication was to identify the personal beliefs and behaviors, cultural characteristics, operational tactics, and administrative practices that accelerate measurable progress as organizations move through distinct phases toward race equity.

Adding Racial Equity to the Menu: An Equity Toolkit for Restaurant Employers

November 1, 2017

This Racial Equity Toolkit provides restaurant management with practical resources for assessing, planning, and implementing steps toward racial equity at your business. There is no step too small: every action you take helps your business thrive and fosters stronger local relationships with your workers and consumers.This toolkit combines the expertise of three national organizations: Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC United), Race Forward, and the Center for Social Inclusion. Collectively, these organizations have decades of experience in restaurant-standards innovation and racial-equity consulting. To ensure this tool is useful, realistic, and accessible for real-life people in the industry, we partnered with two respected fine dining and casual dining restaurants in the San Francisco Bay Area: Alta (San Francisco) and Homeroom (Oakland).

State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review 2017

November 1, 2017

The release of the 2017 State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review comes at a very important time. More than ever, Kirwan and our partners in equity work can see the importance of how we shape the narrative of race and equity in this country. For the last five years, the State of the Science has been one of the ways that we have been able to add depth to this often one-sided narrative, by pointing to the complex underpinnings of how peoples' conception of race influences our perceptions, thoughts, and relationships.This edition of the State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review was originally conceived as a way for Kirwan to get a better understanding on what was still an emerging topic. Five years ago, we could not have imagined how many of our partners would also be interested in this resource as a way to help broaden the national discussion on racial equity. Kirwan is delighted to be able to share this work with legal professionals, non-profit leaders, civil rights activists, doctors, teachers, and everyone in between.This release is a shining example of the tremendous effort and dedication of our Race and Cognition Program to living out Kirwan's mission. The positive acclaim for this publication and its impact on addressing real world inequities continues to make the Kirwan Institute proud. At such an important milestone, it is not only important to celebrate the impact of our work, but we must also look to the future to ensure that the implicit bias research will continue to help us all build a more equitable and inclusive world.

The Competitive Advantage of Racial Equity

October 1, 2017

Corporate America is missing out on one of the biggest opportunities of our time for driving innovation and growth: creating business value by advancing racial equity.Developed in partnership with PolicyLink and funded by the Ford and W.K. Kellogg foundations, The Competitive Advantage of Racial Equity highlights examples from 12 leading companies such as Gap Inc., PayPal, and Cigna, who are driving innovation and growth by advancing racial equity.

Race-Explicit Strategies for Workforce Equity in Healthcare and IT

June 15, 2017

Healthcare and information technology (IT) are two of the fastest growing sectors in the United States and provide numerous high-paying career options around the country. However, most of these living-wage careers are only available to individuals who have advanced degrees and other costly credentials, which are real barriers to many people of color in low-income communities. Providing access into healthcare and IT careers will become an increasingly critical role for workforce development agencies as these sectors continue to take over more of the labor market.Drawing from academic research, interviews with workers of color and key experts in the field, and results from a 2016 Race Forward survey of 70 workforce development organizations nationwide, Race-Explicit Strategies for Workforce Equity in Healthcare and IT identifies barriers to achieving equitable employment outcomes for workers of color in the workforce development field, and outlines solutions to increase racial equity through a systemic,  race-explicit, and outcome-oriented approach.The report identifies major internal and external barriers to greater adoption of race-explicit strategies for equity in the workforce development field, including racial bias and discrimination, limited tracking of racial disparities and outcomes, and a lack of services to support low-income workers of color.

State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review 2016

July 13, 2016

The Kirwan Institute is excited to publish the fourth edition of its annual State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review to deepen public awareness of implicit biases and the challenges they pose to a society that strives to treat all of its members equally. Research from the neuro-, social and cognitive sciences show that hidden biases are distressingly pervasive, that they operate largely under the scope of human consciousness, and that they influence the ways in which we see and treat others, even when we are determined to be fair and objective.This important body of research has enormous potential for helping to reduce unwanted disparities in every realm of human life.The nation's response to the Kirwan Institute's State of the Science reports has been overwhelming. Educators, law enforcement organizations, human resource experts, health care professionals, and many more, have come to rely on this publication every year to help keep them abreast of the latest findings from brain science about implicit bias and to guide them in thinking about the real world implications of that research.Kirwan's Implicit Bias team, lead brilliantly by Cheryl Staats, the author of the first State of the Science, is now engaged throughout the year, leading workshops and presentations in states and communities across the country as the desire for help understanding this important body of research continues to grow.It is our great pleasure, therefore, to provide to the field the 2016 issue of State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review. We hope that it will continue to assist you and your organizations work for a more equitable and inclusive society.

We Too Belong: Resource Guide of Inclusive Practices in Immigration and Incarceration Law & Policy

May 19, 2016

The Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society announces the release of a major new publication, entitled We Too Belong: Resource Guide of Inclusive Practices in Immigration and Incarceration Law & Policy. The resource guide highlights inclusive policies and practices, supplemented by case studies centered at the intersection of immigration and incarceration in the United States.  These systems are sometimes referred to as the "Double Is." "The most marginalized populations in the history of our society were those that were denied public voice or access to private space. Historically, women and slaves experienced this form of marginality. They could not vote, serve on juries, nor run for office, and they were also denied a private space to retreat to, free from surveillance or regulation. Today, immigrants, the incarcerated and the formerly incarcerated, and to a large extent the disabled, most visibly inhabit this marginalized social and spatial location in American society," opened the new resource guide, effectively framing both the problems faced by individuals and the systems that impact their lives.  Developed by a team of seven co-authors, We Too Belong represents nearly three years of research into best practices and policies related to immigration and incarceration in the US. Lead author and Haas Institute Assistant Director Stephen Menendian notes that "There are dozens of cities across this country making real progress towards a more inclusive society, but too often our attention is focused on places where people are struggling. We need to shine a light on what's working, and expand our sense of what's possible. This report does that."    Drawing on the experiences of states and localities attempting to integrate immigrants and the formerly incarcerated into their social and economic fabric, We Too Belong offers a small window into the lives of people affected by these policies. The criminal justice system and immigration law serve to separate individuals from the rest of US society through physical exclusion—including prisons and detention centers. Procedurally, immigration enforcement looks and acts like law enforcement—a phenomenon known as "crimmigration"—while the criminal justice system has locked up 400 people for every 100,000 in the population with the disabled and communities of color disproportionately affected by these systems. The 100-page Resource Guide does not only give an in-depth menu of policies, but also humanizes the "Double Is" by featuring the stories of people who are the most affected by them. These nine perspectives from undocumented, incarcerated, and formerly-incarcerated individuals are featured alongside advocates and scholars who have spent their careers exploring the ways that these structures are impeding a healthy, inclusive society that recognizes the inherent dignity and humanity of all people.  

Let’s Talk About Race: How Racially Explicit Messaging Can Advance Equity

August 11, 2015

As we approach a time when there will no longer be any single racial majority in America, we have to ask ourselves hard questions. Are we comfortable with race, and racial dynamics, as our nation's demographics change? Are we ready to embrace one another despite our perceived differences, or will we choose the cynical acceptance of what has become the norm in our country— ongoing segregation, Black voter suppression, economic exploitation, militarized policing, and mass incarceration? Can we counter the race wedge – the process of using race as a tactic to divide people in order to achieve a political outcome? Are we ready to embrace a new vision of shared prosperity? Are we willing to embrace a truly inclusive democracy?In this report, we explored whether talking about race directly could effectively move people to support progressive fiscal policies. We tested messages that re-frame people of color as contributing, hardworking Americans —"makers" instead of "takers"—with the goal of moving people toward supporting more progressive fiscal policies.

A Call to Action: Aligning Public and Private Investments in Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Communities

May 11, 2015

Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPI) are the fastest growing segment of the American electorate. This population growth brings with it a number of socio-economic implications. This report explores these implications and highlights the many entry points for including AANHPIs in funding strategies.