Racial equity can be defined as "the condition that would be achieved if one's race identity no longer influenced how one fares." (from "Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture" by Equity in the Center). This collection focuses on racial equity and also includes works that explore the larger diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework. Our aim is to raise awareness about funding for racial equity efforts as well as activities in the social sector meant to realize racial equity. The collection is part of Candid's Funding for racial equity special issue website.

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"Endless Walk!" by Rayhane saber licensed through Unsplash

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Listening to Black Californians: How the Health Care System Undermines Their Pursuit of Good Health

October 4, 2022

California, home to the most culturally diverse population in the country and the fifth largest Black population of any state, has a major opportunity to be a leader in health equity. But, again and again, research has shown that racism and structural barriers in the health care system prevent Black Californians from achieving the health they actively seek.Long-standing racial and ethnic health disparities laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with the powerful demonstrations against police violence catalyzed by the murder of George Floyd, prompted CHCF to investigate the relationship between racism and health care that leads to unacceptable health outcomes for Black Californians. To identify solutions for dismantling persistent health inequities, CHCF engaged EVITARUS, a Black-owned public opinion research firm in Los Angeles, to conduct qualitative and quantitative research that listens deeply to Black Californians talking about their experiences with racism and health care.Listening to Black Californians is one of the largest studies focused on the health care experiences of Black Californians to date. The qualitative phases, conducted from June to December 2021, included in-depth interviews with 100 Black Californians and 18 focus groups consisting of Black Californians and key health care stakeholders. The interviews and focus groups informed the content of a statewide survey, conducted from March to May 2022, and completed by 3,325 adult Black Californians recruited to reflect the population based on the 2020 US Census and 2019 American Community Survey.

Creating More Inclusive Public Spaces: Structural racism, Confederate memorials, and building for the future

September 28, 2022

Across the United States over the past decade, there have been heated discussions about Confederate statues and memorials in public spaces. Some cities have removed statues or renamed public spaces memorializing the Confederacy and Confederate leaders, while others remain embroiled in debate. This survey, conducted jointly by PRRI and E Pluribus Unum, examines the role of race and racism in how Americans view Confederate monuments, as well as American attitudes toward creating making public spaces more inclusive.

Americans' Memories of the Civil Rights Movement

August 22, 2022

This new survey released by More in Common finds deep appreciation amongAmericans for the civil rights movement and broad support for teaching about the movement and its legacy, despite polarized debates about race and the teaching of American history in today's public discourse. 

The State of Safety for Asian American and Pacific Islander Women in the U.S.

March 3, 2022

This groundbreaking survey spotlights AAPI women's experiences with discrimination, harassment, and violence amidst the COVID-19 pandemic and one year since the mass shootings in Atlanta that claimed the lives of six Asian American women.

Everyday Donors of Color: Diverse Philanthropy During Times of Change

August 25, 2021

The findings of this research demonstrate expanded philanthropic support from individual donors for racial and social justice causes in 2020. The research also found that while donors of color led this growth, they are also beginning to drive a shift in the sources of influence that have historically shaped the charitable community's approach to racial and social justice giving. The report incorporates data from a national survey of 1,535 households, insights from focus groups with diverse donors, and an analysis of case studies on the impact of mutual aid.

Impact of COVID-19 on the BAME community and voluntary sector: Final report of the research conducted between 19 March and 4 April 2020

April 1, 2020

This report provides the results of two waves of surveys, which were conducted between 19 – 23 March (Wave 1) and between 27 March and 4 April (Wave 2). From these two phases, we received 182 responses from organisations and individuals, which represented 165 different organisations. The surveys focused particularly on the impact of COVID-19 on the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) organisations who deliver services to the Bame communities and covered:Awareness and concerns of COVID-19Impact on the individual: initial and subsequent impact as the crisis worsenedFinancial impact on organisationsImpact on service delivery and organisational preparednessSupport and development needsThe survey confirmed some areas of general concerns within the charity, community and voluntary sector but also flagged up some areas of concerns that seem to be particular to BAME organisations.

Nonprofit Executives and the Racial Leadership Gap: A Race to Lead Brief

May 28, 2019

This brief shifts focus to those who have already reached positions as nonprofit EDs and CEOs to explore how nonprofit executives grapple with the real-world demands of leadership when they attain it. The survey data and insights shared through interviews and focus groups highlight key areas where the pressures of executive leadership seem to be increased for people of color. Despite these challenges, nonprofit EDs and CEOs demonstrate remarkable determination and resilience.

Race to Lead: Women of Color in the Nonprofit Sector

February 5, 2019

This report reveals that women of color encounter systemic obstacles to their advancement over and above the barriers faced by white women and men of color. Education and training are not the solution—women of color with high levels of education are more likely to be in administrative roles and are more likely to report frustrations about inadequate and inequitable salaries. BMP's call to action focuses on systems change, organizational change, and individual support for women of color in the sector. 

Art Museum Staff Demographic Survey 2018

January 28, 2019

In 2014, Ithaka S+R partnered with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD), and the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) to study the representational diversity within art museums through quantitative means. To collect this data, Ithaka S+R developed a survey instrument which was administered to directors of AAMD and AAM member art museums.Four years later, we have administered a similar instrument to these museum directors in order to gauge the extent to which museum staff have changed demographically in recent years. The instrument was slightly expanded, affording new insights into the composition of art museum employees.Key FindingsGender remains majority female; museum leadership positions have grown five percentage points more female in last four years.In curatorial roles, management positions are about 15 percentage points more male than non-management roles.Museum staff have become more racially and ethnically diverse over the last four years.Among intellectual leadership positions, education and curatorial departments have grown more diverse in terms of race/ethnicity, while conservation and museum leadership have not changed.

The Philanthropic Closet: LGBTQ People in Philanthropy

October 15, 2018

The Philanthropic Closet: LGBTQ People in Philanthropy highlights the findings on sexual orientation and gender identity from the inaugural Diversity Among Philanthropic Professionals (DAPP) Survey, a first-of-its-kind pilot study on diversity in philanthropy, conducted in partnership with SMU DataArts and made possible by funding from the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund. 

Dissonance & Disconnects: How entry- and mid-level foundation staff see their futures, their institutions and their field

August 1, 2018

Dissonance & Disconnects: How entry and mid-level foundation staff see their futures, their institutions, and their field, examines the thoughts and feelings of early- and mid- career practitioners on philanthropy and their futures in it. The report focuses on themes including participants' experiences at work, the alignment between their institutions' practices and their values, and how participants see their futures in the sector. It is meant to support conversation among emerging leaders and senior executives about foundation practices and how they can better unlock talent up and down the org chart while also bringing foundations into deeper alignment with their values.

Insight, Impact, and Equity: Collecting Demographic Data

July 31, 2018

Grantmakers occupy a powerful space of privilege in the social change sector. As such, they have a unique opportunity—and responsibility—to work proactively toward equity and inclusivity. Increasingly, grantmaking institutions are challenging themselves to live their values through their grantmaking practices.For philanthropy to advance equity in all communities, especially low-income communities and communities of color, it needs to be able to understand the demographics of the organizations being funded (and declined), the people being served, and the communities impacted. That data should be used to assess practices and drive decision making.PEAK Grantmaking is working to better understand and build the capacity of grantmakers for collecting and utilizing demographic data as part of their grantmaking. Our work is focused on answering four key questions:What demographic data are grantmakers collecting and why?How are they collecting these demographic data?How is demographic data being used and interpreted?How can funders use demographic data to inform their work?With the help of Kelly Brown, former Executive Director of the D5 Coalition, and an advisory committee of grantmakers, we have completed an expansive survey, interviews with grantmakers, and field research on these four questions. Read the key findings from our research.