Racial equity can be defined as "the condition that would be achieved if one's race identity no longer influenced how one fares." (from "Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture" by Equity in the Center). This collection focuses on racial equity and also includes works that explore the larger diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework. Our aim is to raise awareness about funding for racial equity efforts as well as activities in the social sector meant to realize racial equity. The collection is part of Candid's Funding for racial equity special issue website.

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Everyday Donors of Color: Diverse Philanthropy During Times of Change

August 25, 2021

The findings of this research demonstrate expanded philanthropic support from individual donors for racial and social justice causes in 2020. The research also found that while donors of color led this growth, they are also beginning to drive a shift in the sources of influence that have historically shaped the charitable community's approach to racial and social justice giving. The report incorporates data from a national survey of 1,535 households, insights from focus groups with diverse donors, and an analysis of case studies on the impact of mutual aid.

Centering Racial Equity in Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Lessons and Guidance from Human Services Nonprofits

July 21, 2021

Many nonprofit organizations that provide direct human services are exploring how racial equity and inclusion (REI) and performance measurement collectively inform decision-making and strategies that affect their core mission. Human service nonprofits often hold an explicit charge to increase the well-being of people who have been disempowered, disadvantaged, and systematically oppressed. Starting from this mission orientation, organizations can benefit from guidance, outlined in this report, on operationalizing racial equity values within their measurement and evaluation work and acknowledging the systemic barriers that influence client outcomes. 

Moving from Intention to Impact: Funding Racial Equity to Win

July 15, 2021

This joint PolicyLink-Bridgespan analysis says funders are a key part of the racial equity ecosystem: to benefit the entire nation they should both be transparent in reporting where grants go and fund what movement leaders say is needed to achieve enduring change.

Advancing Well-Being by Transcending the Barriers of Whiteness

June 24, 2021

PolicyLink, in partnership with Well Being Trust, developed Advancing Well-Being by Transcending the Barriers of Whiteness to identify "centering whiteness" as a social and institutional framework that prevents meaningful movement toward racial equity, describe specific social and economic inequities that have been exacerbated by this framework, and make clear new narratives that will be necessary for systemic and policy change. This paper, along with the companion Community Dialogue Guide, serve as the starting point for critical dialogues that deepen and build shared understanding across communities.

Racial Justice in Housing Finance: A Series on New Directions

May 19, 2021

The enclosed essays speak from a range of diverse viewpoints to explore how housing finance can be harnessed towards the ends of residential integration, equitable investment, and housing security, rather than purely for profit. Our authors offer ideas across a spectrum of proposed reforms. They describe how aspects of our current housing finance system derive from, or fail to correct for, our deep history of structural racism; they propose concrete steps toward re-engineering our current regulatory structure and housing programs to better advance equity, including addressing the particular harms of racial segregation; and they argue for expanded social housing and other visionary reforms.

Centering Racial Equity in Homeless System Design

April 27, 2021

Between 2017 and 2019, homelessness sharply increased by 43% in Alameda County, California. Housing market failures, homeless system challenges, and long-standing discrimination have produced a crisis in affordable housing and homelessness, which has significantly impacted low-income people and communities of color. The surge in homelessness and its disproportionate racial impacts, especially on African Americans and Native Americans, became the impetus for a revamp of the homeless system modeling process to ensure that it is restructured to employ a racial equity lens. With the goal of producing a homeless system that works better for all to end homelessness in Alameda County, this system modeling process seeks to: 1) Identify and address factors leading to the over-representation of people of color in the population of people experiencing homelessness. 2) Understand how facets of the homeless system benefit or burden people of color and pinpoint opportunities to advance racial equity within the system. 3) Formulate key elements of a model homeless system, including optimal types and quantities of housing units and service programs; and 4) Develop recommendations to more effectively and equitably allocate resources, prioritize investments, and advance proactive, targeted strategies to end and prevent homelessness.

Journey Toward Racial Equity: Baseline Findings from the Racial Equity Capacity Assessment

March 1, 2021

This report represents the latest in an effort by Philanthropy-Serving Organizations (PSOs) to advance philanthropic practice and impact by centering racial equity. Written by some members of United Philanthropy Forum's Racial Equity Committee together with Community Centered Evaluation & Research, the report is based on findings of the Forum's inaugural Racial Equity Capacity Assessment for PSOs. Nearly three-quarters of Forum members completed the assessment, which provides a baseline to examine PSOs' internal efforts and external programming in advancing racial equity. The Forum also completed the assessment, and is using the results to inform the Forum's internal racial equity work.

Advancing Racial Equity in Emergency Rental Assistance Programs

March 1, 2021

The NYU Furman Center, together with the Housing Initiative at Penn and the National Low Income Housing Coalition, recently co-authored a report describing these "first-generation" COVID rental assistance programs, based on a survey of 220 programs across the country. This brief draws upon the analysis from that survey, along with additional document review and interviews with selected program administrators. Based on these sources, the brief highlights several lessons about strategies states and localities can use to design and implement more equitable emergency rental assistance programs.

Districts Advancing Racial Equity (DARE) Tool

January 12, 2021

The DARE tool brings together—in a uniquely broad and practical way—what is known about district actions that can support racial equity. The tool captures research-informed, high-leverage aspects of schooling that leaders must address in order to create systems that build on the strengths of and respond to the needs of students of color. This tool is not an exhaustive, one-size-fits-all manual for advancing racial equity in school districts. Rather, it helps conceptualize and organize systems-level equity work and provides a guide for district leaders to interrogate their systems, set equity-oriented goals, and track progress over time. The tool offers a framework for district leaders and staff to understand the complex ecosystem of policies and practices they design and enact. The tool also contains a set of qualitative and quantitative indicators to support data-informed decision-making and track progress toward greater racial equity.

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color

January 1, 2021

Power Beyond Measure: Reshaping the Research and Evaluation Landscape for Boys and Men of Color is a new research agenda that outlines six strategies for advancing equity and opportunity for Boys and Men of Color (BMOC) in the U.S. These strategies and recommendations lift up ways to ensure their voices and perspectives are reflected in research and funding; to promote power and capacity-building in their communities; and to build more equitable, anti-racist research and evaluation systems.

Unfunded: Black Communities Overlooked by Canadian Philanthropy

December 3, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic and contemporary anti-Black racism movements have shone further light on the systemic racism and hardships faced by Black people in Canada. The experience of Black people in Canada points to the inadequacy of public policy in addressing the concerns of Black communities. It also suggests that Canadian philanthropy has not sufficiently invested in the well-being of Black communities and Black community organizations.This research report provides the first systematic, empirical examination of the extent to which Canadian philanthropy has responded to the unique and intersectional challenges facing Black communities. In establishing the social context and lived experience of Black community members, the report makes apparent that the needs of Black people in Canada are both specific and urgent. Despite the clear case for investment, Canadian philanthropy has largely been absent in supporting Black people in Canada. Evidence that illustrates how Canadian philanthropy has failed to meet the needs of Black people in Canada is drawn from the analysis of two sets of original data: 1) Semi-structured qualitative interviews with ten Black and non-Black philanthropic leaders from across the Canadian philanthropic sector; and 2) a review of the funding portfolios of 40 Canadian foundations.

Indigenous Ways of Giving + Sharing: Indigenous-led Funds Landscape Scan Report

December 1, 2020

This body of work is a gathering place to bring together the wealth of knowledge about Indigenous-led funds and the wisdom of Indigenous leaders in philanthropy; to create a space where Indigenous leaders in philanthropy can learn from each other, and where funders can understand effective and decolonial approaches to grantmaking. This body of work is also a call to action. An invitation for actors within the philanthropic community to reflect upon their power and privilege, and listen to the leadership of Indigenous peoples. The International Funders for Indigenous Peoples commissioned this work in 2020, to amplify the voices of these Indigenous leaders and Indigenous-led funds, so that their calls for stronger support can be answered. To embark on this journey of greater understanding, one must start by humbling oneself to listen deeply and learn; to step outside of the Western and non-Indigenous notions dominating philanthropy; and to open the mind to Indigenous worldviews. This landscape scan will take you on a journey to Indigenous communities,cultures and worldviews all over the world. It will take you into communities who have their own history and understanding of,visions for philanthropy that is richly rooted in ancestral knowledge and cultural values of giving and sharing. If we can make space for the leadership of the Indigenous peoples and communities demanding respect and recognition in philanthropy, together we can transform the way we do grantmaking.