Racial equity can be defined as "the condition that would be achieved if one's race identity no longer influenced how one fares." (from "Awake to Woke to Work: Building a Race Equity Culture" by Equity in the Center). This collection focuses on racial equity and also includes works that explore the larger diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) framework. Our aim is to raise awareness about funding for racial equity efforts as well as activities in the social sector meant to realize racial equity. The collection is part of Candid's Funding for racial equity special issue website.

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Clean Energy Neoliberalism: Climate, Tax Credits, and Racial Justice

June 14, 2022

The defeat of the Democrats' Build Back Better (BBB) legislation raises serious concerns about the direction of federal climate policy during a pivotal decade. However, amid renewed negotiations for a new, scaled-down reconciliation package, one major policy from Build Back Better continues to have widespread support: a 10-year, $300 billion extension and expansion of clean energy tax credits. Should the proposal become law it would be among the most significant climate policies of the Biden administration. While modeling indicates substantial positive impacts for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, heavy reliance on tax credits for addressing climate change raises deep concerns for another major Biden administration goal: achieving equity and justice for disadvantaged communities--the communities most harmed by the fossil fuel economy and most at risk from climate change.In "Clean Energy Neoliberalism: Climate, Tax Policy, and Racial Justice," co-authors Lew Daly and Sylvia Chi explain how energy tax credits embody a neoliberal approach to climate policy that continues to rely heavily on private incentives and market choices to drive the energy transition. They discuss how this could not only privatize the clean energy future but also squander a once-in-a-generation opportunity for remedying historic harms and chronic underinvestment in communities of color.